Orthodontic Treatment Lowers the risk of dental trauma due to protruding teeth

Orthodontic Treatment Lowers the risk of  dental trauma due to protruding teeth

Orthodontic Treatment Lowers the risk of dental trauma due to protruding teeth

Listen to the podcast here.

Young children (ages 6-10) with severely protruded upper front teeth, commonly called “buck teeth,” are at increased risk for dental trauma and may benefit from an orthodontic correction, according to a study published recently in the American Journal of Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics*. The study found that approximately 1 in 3 children who received orthodontic treatment for severely protruding teeth were less likely to experience dental trauma (such as a chipped, broken or knocked out permanent tooth).

“Active children who play organized sports or love the playground and who have severely protruding teeth may benefit from early intervention by an orthodontist,” says Morris N. Poole, DDS, president of the American Association of Orthodontists (AAO). 

“Youngsters with protruding teeth don’t have adequate lip coverage to protect their teeth from a blow or a fall. The result of losing or damaging a front tooth in childhood becomes a lifelong problem. We only get one set of permanent teeth, and the corrective measures to restore or replace a broken or lost tooth can be expensive, and likely will need to be repeated over the course of a lifetime.”

According to the study, protruding teeth occur in about 15 percent of children ages 12 – 15 in the U.S. and is one of the most common problems treated by orthodontists. Early intervention (before adolescence) is warranted in some cases, say the study’s authors. The AAO recommends that all children get a check-up with an orthodontist no later than age 7. If a check-up reveals a child will need orthodontic treatment at some point, the orthodontist will be able to recommend the most appropriate treatment at the most appropriate time.

shares
X
Welcome to Our Website
Welcome to WPBot